Lifestyle Solutions for a Happy Healthy You!

Posts tagged ‘heart health’

9 Amazing Health Benefits of Strawberries

9 Amazing Health Benefits of Strawberries

Fragrant and sweet, strawberries are one of the most popular types of berry in the world — and for good reason. Read below to learn how these little sweet hearts can benefit the organ they resemble — the heart — and more.

  • Reduce Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: According to a Harvard School of Public Health study, women who eat three or more servings of strawberries a week have a lower risk of suffering a heart attack. Strawberries contain the dietary flavonoid anthocyanin, which may benefit the heart by improving blood flow and countering the build-up of plaque, reducing blood pressure and inflammation. The fiber and potassium in strawberries also support heart health.

  • Anti Inflammatory: The colorful pigments of berries (polyphenols) are known to have antioxidant activity. Strawberries lower blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a signal of inflammation in the body. Antioxidants and phytochemicals found in strawberries may also help to reduce inflammation of the joints, which can cause arthritis and can also lead to heart diseaseResearch suggests we have to eat 3 or more servings of strawberries to reap these benefits, so eat up!

  • Anti Cancer: The flavonoid content in strawberries causes the body to interfere with the stages of development of cancer cells, preventing their ability to multiply. Cancer benefits from strawberries are best documented in cases of breast, cervical and esophageal cancer.

  • Antioxidant Powerhouse: Studies suggest that consumption of berry fruits, including strawberries, may have beneficial effects against oxidative stress mediated diseases such as cancer. Strawberries are one of the most highly concentrated antioxidant fruits. Antioxidants help fight carcinogens and LDL, the bad cholesterol which can lead to heart disease. The powerful antioxidants in strawberries work against free radicals, inhibiting tumor growth and decreasing inflammation in the body.

  • Blood Pressure: Due to their high potassium content, strawberries are recommended to those with high blood pressure to help negate the effects of sodium in the body. A low potassium intake is just as big of a risk factor in developing high blood pressure as a high sodium intake.

  • Immunity Boosting: 1 serving, about 8 strawberries or 1 cup, provides more vitamin C than an orange, about 85mg, or 150% of your daily requirement.

  • Nutrient Dense: The massive nutrition packed into these sweet little guys might warrant “superfood” status. Strawberries are a very good source of dietary fiber (3 grams per cup), iodine and folate. Plus, they are a good source of copper, potassium, biotin, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin B6 and omega-3 fatty acids.

  • Aid in Weight Management: Strawberries’ low calorie and high nutritional content make them an excellent choice to include in your diet when watching your weight. They also contain anthocyanins which stimulate the burning of stored fat in the body to use as fuel.

  • Help the brain: Studies suggest that antioxidant-rich berries, including strawberries, may help improve learning and reverse age-related cognitive decline.

Who knew that this sweet little fruit could pack so much nutritional punch! Shopping tip: choose medium-sized berries that are firm, plump and deep red; once picked, they don’t ripen further. As you’re estimating your serving size, keep in mind that 8 large strawberries count as 1 cup. I hope you enjoy this healthy recipe. It’s a perfect summer breakfast or late night treat! Enjoy!

By Magda Rod

Magda Freedom Rod is a yogini and health & lifestyle guide based in Los Angeles. She writes about health & wellness and offers guidance for a sustainable lifestyle. Learn more on her website Visionary-Lifestyle.com.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Excellent Health is found along your journey and not just at your destination. Would it make sense for us to spend several minutes together to discuss your Health Issues or Problems and how HealthyHighway can help YOU Live YOUR Optimum Life? Please complete the information on our Contact Us page to schedule your consultation today! I look forward to helping YOU Live YOUR Optimum Life!

Live Well!

Leesa A. Wheeler

Leesa A. Wheeler

Healthy Lifestyle Coach, Artisan, Author

ring ~ 770-393-1284

write ~ info@healthyhighway.org

visit ~ www.HealthyHighway.org

consult ~ www.healthyhighway.org/contact.html

chews ~ www.Chews4Health.com/Leesa

enjoy ~ www.Chewcolat.com

follow ~ www.twitter.com/HealthyHighway

learn ~ www.healthyhighway.wordpress.com

like ~ www.tinyurl.com/Facebook-HealthyHighway

join ~ www.tinyurl.com/googleplusHealthyHighway

link ~ www.linkedin.com/in/leesawheeler

 

5 Strategies for Adjusting to Daylight Saving Time

5 Strategies for Adjusting to Daylight Saving Time

As the country prepares to “spring forward” an hour for daylight saving time  this Sunday, it’s important to keep in mind how even a tiny time change can  affect your health.

Studies have shown that the spring daylight saving time shift can impact a  person’s wellbeing in several ways:

Sleep struggles: Interruption in regular sleep patterns is  by far the biggest problem following a daylight saving time shift. Even a small  change in your snooze schedule can knock your natural circadian rhythm out of  whack. The resulting lack of sleep in the days following a clock change can lead  to grogginess and loss of mental acuity. Sleepless nights can also eventually  give you more laugh lines. “Sleep deprivation is a form of stress,” points out  Matthew Mingrone, M.D., lead physician for EOS Sleep California Centers. “It  causes your body to make more steroids which decreases the production collagen  which causes thinning of the skin and wrinkles.” (Discover 6 Secret Ways to Reduce  Stress at Home)

Heart attack hazard: Heart attack rates spike by about five  percent in the days after the March time change, according to a 2008 study  published by researchers from the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The same  study showed that there is a subsequent drop in heart  attack occurrences in the fall, when the clocks get turned back.

Worsening willpower: A 2012 study conducted by scientists  from the Penn State Smeal College of Business and Singapore Management  University showed that people are more likely to engage in “cyberloafing”—wasting time on the internet on the Monday after a daylight  saving time change. This inability to focus is a likely result of getting less  sleep. Productivity researchers estimate that the shift may cost businesses  across the country millions of dollars in lost revenue due to decreases in  productivity.

Car crash concerns: Daylight saving time also appears to  impact automobile accident rates. The Monday morning immediately following the “spring forward” time change is riddled with as many as 17 percent more fatal  car crashes than normal, according to Canadian researchers. Experts aren’t in  agreement as to exactly why this occurs, though many speculate that the  phenomenon stems from an increase in sleepy motorists and unsafe  drivers running late for work.

Tips for adjusting to daylight saving time Roth-Maguire and Mingrone offer a few simple steps to help you “spring forward” successfully:

Stick to a routine: Adhering to a regular sleep pattern  (varying the time you go to bed and the time you wake up by no more than 20  minutes) helps keep your internal cycle on track, despite a slight time change,  says Mingrone.

Stay away from sleep disrupters: Caffeine, alcohol,  over-the-counter sleep medications and naps are all no-nos, especially during  the days surrounding daylight saving time, according to Roth-Maguire.

Get some sun: Exposure to natural sunlight helps regulate  your body’s natural rhythms. Depending on where you live, the weather may be too  cold to spend too much time outside, but you can at least pull up the shade and  sit in front of the window for a few minutes.

Work up a sweat: Engaging in some form of cardiovascular  exercise (walking, jogging, biking, swimming) in the late afternoon or early  evening may help you fall asleep easier. If you don’t have the time or energy to  spare, a hot bath can achieve the same result, according to Mingrone, who says  that first raising your body temperature, and then gradually lowering it right  before bed time encourages your body to produce the sleep-inducing hormone,  melatonin.

Practice good sleep “hygiene”: Roth-Maguire says that anyone  having trouble sleeping should ask themselves three questions about their sleep  environment: Is it dark enough? Is it cool enough? Is it quiet enough?

By Anne-Marie Botek, AgingCare.com  Editor

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Excellent Health is found along your journey and not just at your destination. Would it make sense for us to spend several minutes together to discuss your Health Issues or Problems and how HealthyHighway can help YOU Live YOUR Optimum Life?  Please complete the information at www.healthyhighway.org/contact.html to schedule your consultation.  I look forward to helping YOU Live YOUR Optimum Life!

Live Well!

Leesa A. Wheeler

Healthy Lifestyle Coach, Artisan, Author

ring ~ 770-393-1284

write ~ info@healthyhighway.org

visit ~ www.HealthyHighway.org

consult ~  www.healthyhighway.org/contact.html

chews ~ www.Chews4Health.com/Leesa

enjoy ~ www.Chewcolat.com

follow ~ www.twitter.com/HealthyHighway

learn ~ www.healthyhighway.wordpress.com

like ~ www.tinyurl.com/Facebook-HealthyHighway

join ~  www.tinyurl.com/googleplusHealthyHighway

link ~ www.linkedin.com/in/leesawheeler

Strategies to Avoid a Wintertime Heart Attack

6 Strategies to Avoid a Wintertime Heart Attack

 

Whatever their cause, heart symptoms should never be taken lightly—especially  during the winter months. According to Cynthia Thaik, M.D., a cardiologist  and member of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart  Association, research has shown that cardiovascular deaths spike by about 18  percent as the days shorten and the weather cools.

Why do cardiovascular concerns increase in winter?

Cold weather, being indoors more often, stress, lack of vitamin D and changes  in the daylight to nighttime ratio all play a role in increasing a person’s  overall risk of cardiac problems during the winter, says Thaik. There’s also  something about the holiday season that seems to be hard on the heart—Christmas  and New Year’s top the list of dangerous days for cardiovascular problems and  death.

And, according to recent research, it doesn’t seem to matter whether you live  in icy Wisconsin, or sunny Florida—the winter months can still take a toll on  your ticker.

Researchers from the University of New Mexico discovered that people who  lived in Texas, Georgia, Arizona and Los Angeles experienced the same jump in  heart-death risk as those residing in cooler states, such as Massachusetts and  Pennsylvania.

There are things you and your loved one can do to shelter your heart against  winters’ dangerous effects:

Bundle up: Despite the findings of the University of New  Mexico study, Thaik says it’s still important to keep warm during the winter  months because temperature does have an effect on the cardiovascular system.  Cold weather can cause blood vessels to constrict, blood pressure to elevate and  blood to become more prone to clotting, according to Neal Kleiman, M.D.,  cardiologist at the Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center in Houston.

Don’t fall off the wagon: Bitter weather and savory comfort  foods make for an unhealthy combination—especially during the holiday season.  While it’s okay to indulge a bit during celebrations, overall Thaik urges people  to, “keep good habits going during the wintertime.” This means sticking to a  regular exercise  routine and eating a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole  grains.

Don’t forgo meds: Just as maintaining a healthy diet and  exercise plan is important in the winter, so too is sticking to any existing  medication regimen you may have. Kleiman urges people not to “slack off on their  medications,” and other health maintenance habits.

Get happy: Seasonal  affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that strikes during the  winter months. Shorter, cooler days spent inside can cause a person to become  lethargic, hungry and uninterested. As with any type of depression, people  suffering from SAD may be less likely to practice healthy behaviors, such as  engaging in regular physical activity and eating a well-balanced diet. Thaik  says it’s important to avoid getting into this depressive cycle. Make sure you  take time to do things that lift up your mood, such as going for a walk, or  spending time with your family (if doing so doesn’t stress you out).

Don’t be an early bird: According to Thaik, one of the  unrecognized side effects of fewer daylight hours in the winter is that people  tend to try and start their days earlier. But, because blood pressure naturally  spikes in the morning, these early birds could be putting themselves at greater  risk for a heart  attack. She suggests keeping early morning activities to a minimum during  the winter months. “The heart likes to take time and warm up,” she says, “take  things gradually in the morning.”

By Anne-Marie Botek, AgingCare.com  Editor

AgingCare.com  connects family  caregivers and provides support, resources, expert advice and senior housing  options for people caring for their elderly parents. AgingCare.com is a trusted  resource that visitors rely on every day to find inspiration, make informed  decisions, and ease the stress of caregiving.

Top 10 Spring Superfoods

Top 10 Spring Superfoods

Spring is finally here and along with it starts the cascade of vibrant  superfoods.  Obviously, some take a little longer than others, but here are  my picks for the top 10 spring superfoods.  Enjoy!

Artichokes—A medium-sized artichoke is loaded with fiber (about 10 grams) and vitamin  C. It also contains plentiful amounts of the heart- and muscle-health minerals  magnesium and potassium.  It’s also high on the ORAC list of foods that have  high antioxidant values.  High amounts of antioxidants translate into reduced free radicals linked to aging and disease.

Asparagus—An excellent source of nutrients like vitamin K  which is necessary for bone health and folate, asparagus also contains good  amounts of vitamins C, A, B1, B2, niacin, B6, manganese, potassium, magnesium,  and selenium.  Its high folate content makes it especially good for pregnant women who have higher folate needs than most  people.

Chives—Potent in antibacterial, anti-yeast and  antifungal compounds, chives has many similar properties to its  relatives garlic and onion.  Chives also help boost glutathione levels in the  body.  Glutathione is a powerful detoxifier and anti-cancer compound.

Collards—Research shows that collards are among the best  foods for lowering cholesterol levels due to its superior ability to bind to  bile acids in the intestines.  Collard also shows excellent anti-cancer  properties thanks to its naturally-occurring components, including:  glucoraphanin, sinigrin, gluconasturtiian, and glucotropaeolin.

Kale—Proven to lower the risk of bladder,  breast, colon, ovary, and prostate cancer, kale is among the best superfoods  available.  Great for building healthy bones largely due to its high calcium  content, kale also improves the body’s detoxification systems by increasing  isothiocyanates (ITCs) made from the vegetable’s glucosinolates.  Researchers  have identified over 45 phytonutrients in kale, including  kaempferol and quercetin, giving it impressive antioxidant and  anti-inflammatory properties.

Rhubarb—High in fiber, vitamins C and K, rhubarb stalks (not  the leaves which are poisonous), rhubarb is an excellent spring food but most  people don’t know what to do with it.  Sorry, dumping cups of sugar into it for  jams and pies wrecks any superfood qualities this food might otherwise have.  I  enjoy it stewed or added to chutneys.

Spinach—Not just for Popeye anymore, spinach is high in  iron, calcium, beta carotene (which turns into vitamin A in your body), and  vitamin K, which is important for bone and blood health.  The chlorophyll gives  spinach their green color and is a powerful blood cleanser.  High in neoxanthin,  which is proven to aid prostate health, spinach also contains the phytonutrients  lutein and zeaxanthin which strengthen the eyes and help prevent macular  degeneration and cataracts.

Spring greens—Spring greens contain high amounts of calcium  and magnesium needed for strong bones, muscles, and a relaxed nervous system.   Like spinach, they also contain the blood cleansing  phytonutrient chlorophyll.

Strawberries—Just eight strawberries pack more vitamin C  than one orange.  Whether you want to evade heart disease, arthritis,  memory loss, or cancer, these berries have proven their ability to  help.

Watercress—If ever there was a vegetable made for smokers,  watercress is it.  In a study published in the American Journal of Clinical  Nutrition, researchers found that eating raw watercress daily increased the  ability of cells to resist free radical damage to DNA, which reduces the  risk of cell changes linked to cancer.  Their research showed that this protective benefit was pronounced in smokers.  But, anyone can  benefit from this spring nutritional powerhouse.  It is also high in beta  carotene (essential for skin and eye health), B-complex vitamins (important for  nerves, energy, and mood balance), and vitamin E (critical for skin and immune  system health).

By Michelle Schoffro Cook

Michelle Schoffro Cook, MSc, RNCP, ROHP, DNM, PhD is an international best-selling and twelve-time book author and doctor of traditional natural medicine, whose works include: Healing Recipes, The Vitality Diet, Allergy-Proof, Arthritis-Proof, Total Body Detox, The Life Force Diet, The Ultimate pH Solution, The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan, and The Phytozyme Cure. Check out her natural health resources and subscribe to her free e-newsletter World’s Healthiest News at WorldsHealthiestDiet.com.

 

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: