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Archive for July 7, 2012

16 Health Benefits of Lemons

16 Health Benefits of Lemons

 

The Alkalizing Powerfood

Lemons are acidic to the taste, but are alkaline-forming in the body. In fact  they are one of the most alkaline-forming foods; this makes them great for  balancing a highly acidic condition in the body.

Lemons are a favorite all over the world and an essential food in kitchens  everywhere.

“We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial  flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons.” –Alfred E. Newman

16 Health Benefits of  Lemons:

1. Lemons are alkalizing for the body:  Lemons are acidic to  begin with but they are alkaline-forming on body fluids helping to restore  balance to the body’s pH.

2. Lemons are rich in vitamin C and flavonoids that work  against infections like the flu and colds.

3. Your liver loves lemons: “The lemon is a wonderful  stimulant to the liver and is a dissolvent of uric acid and other poisons,  liquefies the bile,” says Jethro Kloss in his book Back to Eden. Fresh  lemon juice added to a large glass of water in the morning is a great liver  detoxifier.

4. Cleans your bowels: Lemons increase peristalsis in the  bowels, helping to create a bowel movement thus eliminating waste and helping  with regularity.  Add the juice of one lemon to warm water and drink first thing  in the morning.

5. Scurvy is treated by giving one to two ounces of lemon  juice diluted with water every two to four hours. In 1747, a naval surgeon named  James Lind cured scurvy with fresh lemons. To this day, the British Navy  requires ships to carry enough lemons so that every sailor could have one ounce  of juice a day. In the past, lemons were replaced with limes; this is where the  English got their nickname “limeys.” Watch this video: “Scurvy Pirates and the Lemon of Love

6. The citric acid in lemon juice helps to dissolve gallstones,  calcium deposits, and kidney stones.

7. Vitamin C in lemons helps to neutralize free radicals  linked to aging and most types of disease.

8. The lemon peel contains the potent phytonutrient tangeretin, which has  been proven to be effective for brain disorders like  Parkinson’s disease.

9. In India, Ayurveda medicine values the lemon as a fruit  and for its properties. It is sour, warm, promoter of gastric fire,  light, good for vision, pungent and astringent.

10. It destroys intestinal worms.

11. When there is insufficient oxygen and difficulty  in breathing (such as when mountain climbing) lemons are very helpful.  The first man to reach the top of Mt. Everest, Edmund Hillary, said that his  success on Mt. Everest was greatly due to lemons.

12. Lemons have powerful antibacterial properties;  experiments have found the juice of lemons destroy the bacteria of malaria,  cholera, diphtheria, typhoid and other deadly diseases.

13. Blood vessels are strengthened by the vitamin P in lemon  thus prevents internal hemorrhage. Also, making it useful in treating high blood  pressure.

14. The symptoms of eye disorders,  including diabetic retinopathy have been shown in research to improve due to the  rutin, found in lemons.

15. Lemons contain 22 anti-cancer compounds, including  naturally occurring limonene; oil which slows or halts the growth of cancer  tumors in animals and flavonol glycosides which stop cell division in cancer  cells.

16. According to The Reams Biological Ionization Theory  (RBTI), the lemon is the ONLY food in the world that is anionic (its electron has a negative charge).  All other foods are cationic  (the outer electron has positive charge.) This makes it extremely useful to  health as it is the interaction between anions and cations that ultimately  provides all cell energy.

History, Trivia and Interesting Lemon Facts:

  • Fashionable ladies used lemon juice as a way to redden their lips during the  European Renaissance.
  • The lemon is a small evergreen tree native to Asia (as well as the fruit  that grows on the tree).
  • The lemon is thought to have originated in the Indus Valley (a Bronze Age  civilization in South Asia) because of a lemon-shaped earring from 2500 BC found  by archaeologists in the area.
  • Lemons have been in cultivation around the Mediterranean from as early as  the first century AD.
  • Lemon trees produce fruit all year round. One tree can produce between 500  and 600 pounds of lemons in a year.
  • Once upon a time lemons were presented as gifts to kings because they were  so rare.
  • California and Arizona produce 95 percent of the entire U.S. lemon  crop.

Lemon Nutrition:

  • Lemons contain vitamin C, citric acid, flavonoids, B-complex vitamins,  calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and fiber.
  • Lemons contain more potassium than apples or grapes. Potassium is beneficial to the heart.
See the table below for in  depth analysis of   nutrients: 

Lemon (Citrus limon), fresh, without peel Nutrition Value per 100 g (Source: USDA National Nutrient data base)

Principle Nutrient Value Percentage of RDA
Energy 29 Kcal 1.5%
Carbohydrates 9.32 g 7%
Protein 1.10 g 2%
Total Fat 0.30 g 1%
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Dietary Fiber 2.80 g 7%
Vitamins
Folates 11 µg 3%
Niacin 0.100 mg 1%
Pantothenic acid 0.190 mg 4%
Pyridoxine 0.080 mg 6%
Riboflavin 0.020 mg 1.5%
Thiamin 0.040 mg 3.5%
Vitamin C 53 mg 88%
Vitamin A 22 IU 1%
Vitamin E 0.15 mg 1%
Vitamin K 0 µg 0%
Electrolytes
Sodium 2 mg 0%
Potassium 138 mg 3%
Minerals
Calcium 26 mg 3%
Copper 37 µg 4%
Iron 0.60 mg 7.5%
Magnesium 8 mg 2%
Manganese 0.030 mg 1%
Zinc 0.06 mg 0.5%
Phyto-nutrients
Carotene-߸ 3 µg
Carotene-a 1 µg
Crypto-xanthin-ß 20 µg
Lutein-zeaxanthin 11 µg

How to pick a good lemon:

  • Heavier lemons will have the most mineral content and sugar, thus  thick-skinned lemons will be lighter than thin-skinned lemons and will have less  sweetness and fewer minerals.
  • The ones with the most juice will have finely-grained texture peels.
  • Lemons should be fully yellow; the ones with green tinges have not fully  ripened and will be very acidic.
  • Over-ripe lemons will have a wrinkling look, soft or hard patches and will  not be a vibrant yellow.
  • Lemons stay fresh kept at room temperature (not in sunlight) for about seven  to 10 days; or store them in the refrigerator crisper for about four to five  weeks.

How to use lemons:

  • “When life gives you a lemon… squeeze it, mix it with six ounces of  distilled water and drink twice daily.” –Jethro Kloss in his book Back to  Eden
  • A bowl of fresh lemons will add fragrance and color to a room for days.
  • Alkalize with lemon water.
  • To reducing sodium intake, squeeze fresh lemon on salads, steamed  vegetables, soups and stews.
  • Roll a lemon on the counter a few times before squeezing to maximize the  amount of juice.
  • Lemon juice can be stored for later use by putting freshly squeezed lemon  juice in ice cube trays until frozen, then store them in containers in the  freezer.
  • Dried lemon zest should be stored in a cool and dry place in an airtight  glass container.
  • The zest of fresh lemon is a wonderful addition to cakes, cookies and in  vegetables.
  • Finally…try a Lemon Facial Cleanser …as recommended by Dr. Oz.

“When life gives you lemons, make grape juice and let the world wonder how  you did it.”  –Tori Truax

Lemon Cautions:

  • Pure lemon juice contains acid which is harmful to tooth enamel. Always  dilute with water before drinking it.
  • Lemons that are not washed properly, like the ones you get in restaurants,  may include potentially pathogenic microbes.

Delicious Lemon Recipes

By Diana Herrington

Diana Herrington turned a debilitating health crisis into a passion for  helping others with healthy, sugar-free, gluten-free, eating and cooking. After  testing and researching every possible healthy therapy on her delicate system  she has developed simple, powerful principles which she shares in her recent  book Eating Green and Lean, and as host to Care2 groups: Healthy  Living Network and Healthy  Cooking. She is the head chef at Real  Food for Life, where she shares recipes and tips. Sign up for the Real Food  for Life weekly newsletter or catch her on Facebook  or  Twitter (@DancinginLife).

 

3 Super-Healing Summer Melons

3 Super-Healing Summer Melons

 

Cantaloupe for Healthy Eyes

The orange color gives away some of this fruit’s healing ability. One cup of  cantaloupe contains enough beta-carotene to provide your full daily intake of  vitamin A. Beta-carotene converts into vitamin A which is proven to reduce the  risk of cataracts by 50 percent.  Cantaloupe also contains enough  antioxidants to reduce the risk of macular degeneration.

Honeydew for a Dewy Complexion

Honeydew melon (the green-fleshed one) is a natural source of the mineral  copper, which assists in skin repair and skin cell regeneration. Additionally,  this melon is rich in vitamin C which helps boost collagen levels. Collagen  tends to become depleted as we age, causing wrinkling. Eating more honeydew  melon may help prevent small lines and wrinkles.

Watermelon for a Healthy Prostate and Liver

Tomatoes aren’t the only food that contains high amounts of the phytonutrient  lycopene. So does watermelon. Lycopene is known for its prostate protecting,  anti-aging, and disease-thwarting powers.  Watermelon contains the  important nutrient glutathione that helps to detoxify the liver. Water is also  showing promise as an alternative to Viagra for erectile dysfunction. Keep an  eye out for my upcoming article “The Fruit that Works like Viagra” for more  information.

By Michelle Schoffro Cook

Michelle Schoffro Cook, MSc, RNCP, ROHP, DNM, PhD is an international  best-selling and 12-time book author and doctor of traditional natural medicine,  whose works include: Healing  Recipes, The Vitality Diet, Allergy-Proof, Arthritis-Proof, Total Body  Detox, The Life Force Diet, The  Ultimate pH Solution, The 4-Week Ultimate Body Detox Plan, and The Phytozyme  Cure.  Check out her natural health resources and subscribe to her free  e-newsletter World’s Healthiest News at WorldsHealthiestDiet.com  to receive monthly health news, tips, recipes and more. Follow her on Twitter @mschoffrocook  and Facebook.

 

Change Your Sense of Time

Change Your Sense of Time

 

The best use of time is to reconnect to your being. The misuse of time comes  down to the opposite: Moving away from your being. There is always enough time  to evolve because you and the universe are unfolding together.

  • If timelessness is part of your being, the wish will come true spontaneously  without delay. You have the power to play with time as you would any other part  of your world.
  • If timelessness has a tentative relationship to your being, some wishes will  come true spontaneously, and others won’t. There will be delays and an uneasy  sense that you might not get what you want. Your ability to play with time is  shaky by developing.
  • If timelessness has no relationship to your being, it will take work and  determination to get what you want. You have no power over time. Instead of  playing with it, you are subject to its inexorable march.

From these three broad categories one can project three different belief  systems. Consider which one best applies to you:

1. I am pressed for time. There aren’t enough hours in the day to accomplish  everything I want.

2. I consider myself pretty lucky. I’ve gotten to do a lot of the things I’ve  always wanted to do.

3. I believe that the universe brings you whatever you need. If I don’t get  what I want, I realize that something inside me is blocking it. I spend my time  working on my inner awareness far more than struggling with outside forces.

Once you gain even a hint that wishes can come true without so much struggle,  you can resolve to move to a new stage of growth. You can resolve today to  change your relationship to time:

  • I will let time unfold for me.
  • I will keep in mind that there’s always enough time.
  • I will follow my own rhythm.
  • I will not misuse time by procrastination and delay.
  • I will not fear what time brings in the future.
  • I will not regret what time brought in the past.
  • I will stop racing against the clock.

Try to adopt just one of these resolves today and see how it changes your  reality.  Adapted from The Book of Secrets, by Deepak Chopra (Harmony Books,  2004).

By Deepak Chopra

Acknowledged as one of the world’s greatest leaders in the field of mind body medicine, Deepak Chopra, M.D. , continues to transform our understanding of the  meaning of health. Chopra is known as a prolific author of over 49 books with 12  best sellers on mind-body health, quantum mechanics, spirituality, and peace. A  global force in the field of human empowerment, Dr. Chopra’s books have been  published in more than 35 languages with more than 20 million copies in  print.

 

8 Tips to Become a Morning Person

8 Tips to Become a Morning Person

 

You don’t have to naturally be an early bird to become one. Make the  following changes to your daily routine and environment and give  yourself a little time to adjust and you, too, can be one who effortlessly gets  the proverbial worm.

1. Go to bed early.

Yes, it’s a given, but it’s important enough to emphasize; in order  to wake  up early and feel refreshed, you must go to bed early enough to  get a full  night’s sleep. Additionally, you should make your bedtime  consistent every  night in order to create a pattern that you will  instinctively follow if  repeated long enough.

2. Wake up at the same time every day.

Just as too little sleep makes you tired, too much sleep does the  same  thing. Plus, if you don’t create a pattern for your body to follow,  it will  resist your early-bird intentions. Wake up at the same time  every day,  including weekends, until your body adjusts and ultimately,  you may not need a  wake-up call at all.

3. Get a relentless alarm clock.

The yin to the above tip’s yang, you aren’t likely to get up early  if you  can perpetually hit the snooze button. Find a fool-proof way to  make sure you  wake when you are supposed to—without delay—and you’re on  your way to morning  person status.

4. Don’t drink caffeine or excessive alcohol in the evening.

All your good intentions will be foiled if you drink the wrong  beverages.  Caffeine obviously keeps you perky, which is great up until  the time you’re  ready to go to sleep. Don’t drink any after noon,  especially when you’re  starting out your new routine, to give you better  snoozing odds. Alcohol, too,  can foil best-laid sleeping plans. It may help you get groggy,  but later it disrupts sleep, causing exhaustion that lingers into the next  day.

5.  Exercise in the early evening.

While exercise gets the heart rate going and boosts energy, it also  helps  you get seriously restful sleep—so long as you give yourself  enough winding-down time after your workout. Break a sweat right after work and you’ll have plenty of  time to get groggy before bedtime. Bonus: It  helps eliminate the stress that  might keep your mind busy when it should  be snoozing.

6. Eat healthy early evening meals.

Food hangovers happen all the time. In fact, most of us are  suffering from  one at any given time. Unfortunately, the kind of foods  you eat can disrupt  sleep, too. While you’re not likely to change your  diet just to accommodate  sleep, you can and should eat on the early side  so your body isn’t overwhelmed  trying to digest and dream.

7. Prepare for your day the night before.

Being a morning person doesn’t have to mean you bound out of bed and  whiz  around. Any sleepy shortcomings you have can be overcome with some  advance  planning. Get your coffee at the ready, lay out your wardrobe  for the day, and  make your lunch the night before. Then you’ll have less  to do as you drowsily  get into your new routine.

8. Reconfigure your bedroom for optimal sleep.

Sleep experts everywhere recommend that you make your bedroom a  sleep  sanctuary. That means you should keep stimulating distractions,  such as the TV,  smartphone, or computer, out of the bedroom and focus solely on soothing things  that are conducive to getting your snooze on.

By Samantha, selected from DivineCaroline

At DivineCaroline.com, women  come together to learn from experts in the fields, of health, sustainability,  and culture; to reflect on shared experiences; and to express themselves by  writing and publishing stories about anything that matters to them. Here, real  women publish like real pros. Together, with our staff writers, they’re  discussing all facets of women’s lives from relationships and careers, to travel  and healthy living. So come discover, read, learn, laugh and connect at DivineCaroline.com.

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