Lifestyle Solutions for a Happy Healthy You!

Secrets of Longevity from the Oldest Man in the World …

Montana resident Walter Breuning was born September 21, 1896. He is 113 years old, soon to be 114, and has earned the title of “World’s Oldest Man.”  In less than three years he will become the oldest man ever… which Walter stated he has every intention of being here at that time.

What are Breuning’s Secrets?

“As long as you use your mind and your body, you’re going to be in better shape every day,” Breuning says. “I never even thought about growing old.”

These are wise words coming from a man who has surpassed the centenarian mark by over a decade. He can’t credit his longevity to “good genes,” either, as his mother died at age 46, his father at 50, and his four siblings in their 70s.

Instead, it’s clear that Breuning’s lifestyle has added years to his life, and life to his years.

Keeping busy and practicing all things in moderation are Breuning’s words of advice. He advises staying active in mind and body, not eating too much and being good to those around you, the Great Falls Tribune reported.

“If you’re in good health, you’ve got everything there is,” Breuning told the Great Falls Tribune.

“The Centenarian Spirit”

If kids today follow a healthy diet, exercise and have decent genetics, researchers believe most will live past 100 in good health. Yet there’s more to it than that, and those who have lived to a ripe old age of 100 or more almost always seem to have it: a positive outlook, a love for life and a can-do attitude. Some call this “the centenarian spirit.”

Lynn Adler, who founded the nonprofit National Centenarian Awareness Project, told the Christian Science Monitor that the centenarian spirit is “a group of traits associated with exceptionally long, active lives, including courage and a sense of humor. But it’s attitude, too: It’s the remarkable ability to renegotiate life at every turn, to accept the losses that come with aging, and not let it stop them…. It’s not just how long you live, but how well.”

Studies have, in fact, shown that being optimistic may add years to your life. Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh analyzed data from more than 100,000 women and found those who were optimistic were:

  • 14 percent less likely to die from any cause than pessimists
  • 30 percent less likely to die from heart disease after eight years of follow-up
  • Less likely to have high blood pressure, diabetes or smoke cigarettes

Further, women who were very mistrustful of others, a trait researchers called “cynically hostile,” were 16 percent more likely to die during the study period, and 23 percent more likely to die from cancer, than women who were not.

The “new centenarians” are taking the world of aging by storm, doing far more than just waking up with a smile on their faces; they’re traveling, teaching classes, even doing consultant work in their retired fields of expertise. A common thread among them seems to be staying active, challenging their minds, and interacting with people on a social and intellectual level.

How Can You “Prepare NOW” to Join the Centenarian Crowd?

What will YOU do with your golden rules? The sky’s the limit …

The number of Americans aged 100 and over rose by 35 percent from 1990 to 2000 to 50,454. In 2010, it’s estimated that the number of centenarians will have increased to 79,000, according to the U.S. Census.

Further, as CSMonitor.com reported, it’s estimated that by 2050, one in every 5,000 people will be over 100, with the largest numbers of centenarians residing in China, India, the United States and Japan.

How can you be one of them?

A study in the Archives of Internal Medicine identified five factors that helped men to not only live longer, but also to be healthy and well-functioning in their 90s.

  1. Don’t Smoke: Smokers had double the risk of dying before 90 compared with non-smokers.
  1. Keep a Healthy Weight: Obese men were 44 percent more likely to die before 90 than non-obese men.
  1. Avoid High Blood Pressure: Men with high blood pressure were 28 percent more likely to die before 90.
  1. Exercise Regularly: Men who exercised regularly reduced their risk of death by 20 percent to 30 percent, compared to men who never did.
  1. Avoid Diabetes: Men with diabetes were 86 percent more likely to die before 90 than men without the illness.

Further, you’ve got to keep your attitude positive and your love for life strong. YOU control how you view a situation and whether you perceive it negatively or positively. So if negative thoughts enter your mind, do not give them any attention.

Instead, focus on the many good things in your life and be grateful for what you have, especially the things you may take for granted, like food, shelter, your health and people who love you, and whom you love in return.

Exercise that enhances your mind-body connection and help you relieve stress at the same time can be extremely helpful in keeping you positive and young at heart, and we are extremely excited to introduce for you a one-of-a-kind mind-body fitness program called SheaNetics, from MySheaNetics.com http://mysheanetics.com/.

SheaNetics realizes finding total health and fulfillment that is life lasting can be achieved by creating harmony in body, mind and self, and incorporates the philosophy that “fitness is both a state of the body and mind.” It is based on the Five Living Principles that follow:

  1. Your “Commitment”: Making a promise to do something, whether it is a workout, seeking better health or just being a better person.
  1. Your “Perseverance”: Establishing a perpetual belief that “If I try, I will succeed.” You build toward your goal one solid step at a time.
  1. Your “Self-Control”: Coming to the realization that you are responsible for everything you do. How you react to the events happening in your life is the only outcome of any event that you can consciously determine.
  1. Your “Integrity”: Not examining the result, only the effort made. It is the level of honesty in the quality of effort you give to the execution of whatever you strive to do — it has to be the best you can do.
  1. Gaining, Getting, Giving “Love”: Openness and respect for yourself, others and what life has to offer. It is the willingness to explore and interact with people, to listen, learn and share, and to always set the best example possible.

We encourage you to check out Shea’s new 6-Disc DVD/CD workout set to get started on your pathway to lifelong well-being!

Of course, trying to fit too many tasks into a day, or filling your time with too many stressful activities, will wear you down, no matter how positive you try to stay. Organize your life so you have time to appreciate little enjoyments, spend time with family and friends who make you feel good, and take time for yourself when you need it.

If you need some help in this area, Staying Healthy in a Stressful World CD, the highly praised CD by Dr. Peter Reznik, one of the most respected mind/body integrative therapists of our time, will actually help you to embark on a practice for transforming your stress into life-enhancing experiences.

Use Your Mind to Stay Young …

Finally, remember to focus your mind on what you can achieve, rather than what you can’t. Avoid telling yourself that you’re “too old” or “it’s too late” to accomplish your dreams.

According to the Law of Attraction, if you focus on positive things you’ll attract good into your life. But the opposite also holds true: if you worry constantly and think negatively, you may attract more of that into your life.

So be generous with your dreams and allow your mind to take you wherever you want to go. And no matter what you do, keep your curiosity, your drive and your desire to experience and learn about new things.

Elsa Hoffmann, a 102-year-old who has “limited” her travel from her Florida residence to South America and possibly Russia, had some more wise words we can all live by … as she said in The Christian Science Monitor, “From childhood, I was always one to organize parties and games and things like that,” she says. “When I have days off, I catch up on my bills and stocks … I don’t think there’s anything I say I can’t go to or don’t want to do.”

Here’s a link to his 113th birthday party on You Tube!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9UPU2ThSDs&feature=player_embedded

by www.sixwise.com

Sources

CSMonitor.com April 17, 2010

HuffingtonPost.com July 20, 2009

Reuters.com March 5, 2009

Archives of Internal Medicine February 11, 2008;168(3):284-290.

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